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Seed Treater

Seed Treater machinery designed to allow farmers the flexibility to treat their own seeds just before planting is now available at affordable pricing.

Treating Seeds Right on the Farm

Most seeds used in agriculture today are treated with some sort of chemical, growth hormone, or genetically modified organism to protect the seeds, nourish the soil, and increase the yield. Different treatment blends are offered by companies that treat the seeds and sell them to farmers. Some are treated to withstand a light frost after planting, while others are treated to keep them from rotting if the field floods. Most blends are designed to combat unpredictable weather conditions that have the capacity to destroy a crop before it can start to grow.

Issues with Mass Seed Treating

Treating seeds in massive quantities compromises the coverage of the seeds. Some may be only partially covered, some may lose the coating by friction with other seeds, and some seeds can become stuck together during the treatment process. This inconsistency can be a problem depending on which bags of seed a farmer is sold. Those in the first bag packaged from the treating machine will probably be covered better than those in a middle or end bag.

 

There are also only so many different blends that are offered. The limited selection can be an issue for farms with depleted soil, small farms that do not have the space to rotate crops, and large farms with varied soils. Mixing a private blend is possible, but labor intensive and may delay planting.

Treating Seeds Quickly

Seed Treater machinery designed to allow farmers the flexibility to treat their own seeds just before planting is now available at affordable pricing. Farmers can experiment with blends that will provide desired results or purchase pre-made blends from the company that sells the machinery. They can also treat seeds as needed, which cuts down on paying for seeds that may not be used in the season.

Selecting the Right Machine

There are currently three sizes of machines to accommodate different farm sizes. The smallest one is suitable for a farm that treats up to 2,500 units per season. There are also machines that treat up to 5,000 and 7,500 units per season. A full return on the investment has been experienced by some farmer in the first season used. Others realize a full return in the next year or two.